Journey of Vasanas: Influence Beyond Death

Learn about vasanas, shaping destinies across lifetimes, weaving tales of transcendence.

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Listening to your soothing voice itself brings me out of my anxiety and stress.😌 -Sharmada

I always get exact things right time from Vedadhara. Was just looking to find out the meaning of vasana.🙏🙏 -Snehal

Such a deep subject so easlily explained. Guruji also explained what to do with vasanas.❤️❤️ -Umesh

Getting very deep knowledge. Pls continue posting.🌸🌹🌷👍❤️ -Rajeev Kulkarni

I had a different idea about Hinduism before I came upon this website.👍 -Christopher

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In which ocean did Dwaraka sink?

The Arabian Sea.

What is the meaning of Bhagavata?

Anything that belongs to Bhagavan or Bhagavati is called Bhagavata. Anything that is connected to Bhagavan of Bhagavati is also Bhagavata. The bhakta is also called Bhagavata. भगवतो भगवत्या वा इदम्। तयोः संबन्धिनि च। भक्तः।

Quiz

Who is Jatayu's father?

So far in Yoga Vasishta, we have seen Sriram Ji expressing his concerns about the nature of the world to Sage Vishwamitra. But Vishwamitra did not answer his questions himself. Vishwamitra requested Sage Vasishta, who was present in Dasharatha's court, to address Sriram Ji's concerns. That's why the book is called Yoga Vasishtam. We are now in the 3rd Sarga of Mumukshu Vyavahara Prakarana. How do vasanas get carried forward into the next birth? By the way, what is a vasana? Vasanas are subtle impressions in the mind from past experiences. They shape thoughts, desires, habits, an....

So far in Yoga Vasishta, we have seen Sriram Ji expressing his concerns about the nature of the world to Sage Vishwamitra. But Vishwamitra did not answer his questions himself. Vishwamitra requested Sage Vasishta, who was present in Dasharatha's court, to address Sriram Ji's concerns. That's why the book is called Yoga Vasishtam. We are now in the 3rd Sarga of Mumukshu Vyavahara Prakarana.

How do vasanas get carried forward into the next birth? By the way, what is a vasana? Vasanas are subtle impressions in the mind from past experiences. They shape thoughts, desires, habits, and actions. Vasanas come from past experiences and actions and influence present and future lives. Spiritual liberation also involves freeing oneself from vasana's influence.

We know only what we have experienced. Even our imagination is limited in scope. Even the wildest imagination is based on our knowledge and experience. A tribal person living deep inside the Amazon forest, cut off from the rest of the world, will never be able to imagine what the Ram Mandir at Ayodhya is like. It will not appear even in his dream.

So at the time of death, only the physical body decays. The subtle body still remains comprising of the life force called prana together with mind, intelligence, ego, awareness, the jnanendriyas, and the karmendriyas. Jnanendriyas and karmendriyas are not the physical organs but the underlying functions. This subtle body is called the Ativahika Sharira.

When alive, you are exposed to so many experiences. We get attached to some of them, many of them. They leave impressions in the subtle body. Not each and every experience but only some of them. These are what you have gathered for yourself on your way. The rest have been filtered out. These are your vasanas. Only these vasanas, these impressions remain with you at the time of death. It is like you might have met 10,000 people during your lifetime so far but know only a few of them by their names, physical forms, or relationships. Do you remember the name of your classmates who were absent on the 120th day of your 5th standard, 5th-grade class? No, you don't keep such information with you. Such information does not leave an impression on you. They don't create vasana. But you would still remember the name and form of your strictest teacher. Because he has left a lasting impression on you. It has created a vasana on you.

So your world at the time of death is a collection of these vasanas or impressions. You know only that much. Nothing else. These vasanas are imprinted into your Ativahika sharira. Just before death, only this world is visible to you, available to you. So wherever you are going, it is this world that you are going to continue to have. Only the physical body will be a new one.

This is what the Gita also wants to convey vide shloka no 6 of chapter 8:

यं यं वापि स्मरन्भावं त्यजत्यन्ते कलेवरम्। तं तमेवैति कौन्तेय सदा तद्भावभावितः।।

That means even though life is transient, but the essence of our experiences, shaped as vasanas, continues beyond physical death. They influence our future lives. Our understanding and imagination are constrained by our experiences. We can only perceive and comprehend what we have been exposed to. This limits our ability to understand what is beyond our experience. Attachment to experiences creates and reinforces vasanas. Detachment allows them to fade away. Spiritual liberation involves recognizing and transcending these attachments. At the core of our being lies the collection of our vasanas. They define our perceived reality at the time of death. This underscores the importance of inner development and the cultivation of positive impressions or no impressions at all if you want mukti from rebirths. While the physical body separates, our subtle body, carrying vasanas, persists. This continuity of identity across lifetimes emphasizes the interconnectedness of existence.

So - Recognize the influence of past experiences on thoughts, desires, and actions. Cultivate self-awareness to understand your vasanas and their impact on your life. Strive to cultivate detachment from transient experiences and material possessions. Focus on what truly matters and avoid becoming overly attached to pleasures or possessions. Embrace mindfulness practices to stay present and aware in each moment. By being mindful, you can observe your own thoughts and reactions without becoming overly identified with them. Expand your horizons by seeking out new experiences, knowledge, and perspectives. Recognize the limitations of personal experience and remain open to learning from others and exploring diverse viewpoints. Engage in regular self-reflection to assess your values, goals, and priorities. Strive for personal growth and development, continuously working to overcome negative vasanas and cultivate positive qualities such as generosity, patience, and resilience. Explore questions of existence, purpose, and the nature of reality through spiritual inquiry and contemplation. Seek wisdom from various sources. Strive for balance in all aspects of life, including work, relationships, leisure, and personal development. Prioritize self-care and well-being, maintaining harmony between physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions.

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